SCTE creates Generic Access Platform standards project for cable | Cable | News | Rapid TV News
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The Society of Cable Telecommunications Engineers (SCTE) and its global arm, the International Society of Broadband Experts (ISBE), have created a Generic Access Platform (GAP) project within SCTE•ISBE Standards.

SCTE charter 7Aug20 18The project will be conducted within the Interface Practices Subcommittee (IPS) and is intended to expedite product innovation by developing a common framework for interfaces within node housings.

Within the scope of the GAP project, IPS will develop standardised physical, thermal, mechanical and electrical interfaces for node housings or families of node housings. The goal is to enable technology partners to devote resources to technology innovation that brings value to cable system operators, instead of expending time and effort on re-developing housings for each new generation of outside plant access equipment.

The GAP project is being chaired by two engineers from Charter Communications: Kevin Kwasny, Principal Engineer II–OSP, Advanced Engineering, and Roger Stafford, Principal Engineer III, Network and Premise Engineering. Members of the working group include representatives of Charter Communications, Cox Communications, Liberty Global and Shaw Communications, as well as a wide range of vendors. At least five vendor companies have joined the SCTE•ISBE Standards Program so they can participate in the GAP project.

“Solutions that optimise flexibility, agility and scalability are essential to achieving service velocity for the deployment of innovative technologies,” said Matt Petersen, VP of Access Architecture for Charter. “The Generic Access Platform is intended to create an improved operational environment in which any module that is compliant with the GAP specification will be able to coexist with other GAP-compliant modules that are physically able to be installed in a GAP-compliant housing.”

“The GAP program builds on earlier concepts in interface standardisation,” added Dean Stoneback, senior director, engineering and standards for SCTE•ISBE. “The goal of the working group is to improve time to market and total cost of ownership for all types of HFC solutions, including DOCSIS, Wi-Fi, PON, 5G and business services.”